Categories
On My Writings

Update to Posting Schedule

Hey everyone!

I have decided to make some pretty big changes to my posting schedule.

First, let me tell you why I have made these changes to the blog. I have noticed that my articles are not getting a lot of views when I post them weekly, even though they do okay after a matter of time has gone by. But, if I’m putting in effort to be putting out articles weekly, that’s taking away from the time I have to be writing my books. So, if I switch up my posting schedule, I’ll have more time for the projects I am super passionate about and hopefully finish those sooner.

Second, a change to the newsletter. I’ve decided I’m going to be changing when I send my newsletter (named “The Raven”). Why? Well, for one thing, it wasn’t getting read by many of you. In fact, I think Issue 15 (April 11th’s edition) only 40% of you subscribers read it. I think a reason for this is, I send it too frequently. People get a lot of emails these days, and I know even when I get a lot of emails from certain lists, I just mark them as read. But, there are newsletters that I get that hardly ever get sent out, and I always read those in full. So I’ve decided to shorten the number of newsletters I send and hopefully, that will help you guys not to have as many emails in your email!

Third, the actual changes. So I have decided to change my weekly posting of blog posts to biweekly. I’ll still post on Tuesdays, but I’ll only post on the first and third Tuesday of the month. This will give me more time to write better posts as well. I said I would be changing when I would send “The Raven” as well. I have decided to only send it out on the last Saturday of the month. This is so I don’t clog up your emails and that, hopefully, they will be more attractive to be read.

Thanks to all of my dedicated readers of the blog! Let me know if you think there are any other changes that should be implemented or not.

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
Uncategorized

Quick Break

Hey guys!

I just thought I’d write you all a post explaining the absence of one this week. I have a lot on my plate this week and I thought it would be wise if I took the week off from writing a new blog post so I can be sure to accomplish everything I need to.

As a short update: I did write more in #tIRS a couple of nights ago for the first time in a while. I ended up putting in about 1k words! Hopefully I’ll pick up steam with it and have the rough draft done soon.

Thank you all for your patience with me. I hope y’all are staying safe during this different time. Stay safe out there!

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.

-Titus S. Watson

Categories
#aSotS #tIRS On My Writings

April 2020 Update on My Projects

Well, another month has passed by so it’s time for me to give you an update on my projects. You may have noticed that I haven’t titled this article “April 2020 Update on #tIRS” and I did that for a reason. I now am working on two projects at one time. I’m still working on #tIRS, but I’m also working on a short story collection as well.

The Epic Fantasy Project – #tIRS

Not much has happened here I’m afraid. I’ve put in a few words here and there, but I’m still at about 26k words. While I am very proud of what I’ve written so far, however rough it may be, I decided to take a break from it for a couple of weeks. This is because I have passed a major plot point in the book, and I feel I did much better writing the first act of the book this time then I did in my first attempt. My goal is still to finish writing the rough draft by the end of the summer, and I think I will accomplish that goal. But, writing the second act is probably going to go a lot slower as I will need to accomplish a lot not only to set up the climax but to hint at what’s to come in the series. This first draft really is only me putting the story down on paper, but I do want it to be the best it can be that way I don’t have a lot of work to get done. As I write it and come up with more and more ideas, I am beginning to realize that the first book is going to be the shortest in the series by far because the rest of the series will have more viewpoint characters and grow more complicated. I think when I go to outline book two, I’ll need to outline at least books two and three so I can properly foreshadow what’s to happen at the end of book three. After I finish book three, I will probably work on some other projects before finishing off the series.

I think I will say that while my goal is for these to be published books one day, I do not write them solely for the purpose of publishing them. If they get published, awesome! If they don’t, that’s fine. I love writing and this story is one I want to write. So I won’t stop writing #tIRS if I don’t get it published. I will definitely continue writing it.

Short Story Collection

I’m fairly certain that this is the first time that I have mentioned this project in one of my articles. So let me give you guys a brief description of what it is. The book is going to be a collection of short stories. These short stories all have the same two main characters and several recurring characters. The story is set in America in the 1950s. The short stories will all be mysteries and each short story is a different case. The idea spiraled out of me when I began to think about classic detectives such as Sherlock Holmes, Poirot, or Father Brown. All those characters weren’t set in America and none of them were set in modern times or close to modern times. So I’ve been exploring the idea and have come up with some really good stuff. I am still working on outlining the introductory short story which will most likely end up being closer to a novella. But, I have already finished the second short story in the book. My goal is for this to be a good project that I can take quick breaks away from the intensity of #tIRS (it takes a lot of brainpower to keep up with all my characters and places) and write a quick story and then return back to #tIRS. I don’t know when I’ll say that this collection is complete, but there definitely won’t be just one collection.

The Science Fiction Project

This project is going to take the back burner for a while. I might begin outlining it once I finish the rough draft of #aSotS, but I doubt I will even start until I’m completely finished with #aSotS.

I know, that’s quite a lot of projects! I don’t want to give estimates on when I will have them out for you guys to read because I will be submitting #aSotS to agents and publishers first, and from what I read it can take a while to get responses. I hope that it will be sooner rather than later for these projects, but before I start thinking about publication, I need to finish writing them!

I also want to take a moment and thank you guys for reading. I may not have many readers of this blog, but the few of you that do are faithful readers and read almost every article. While the numbers are still few, I am very thankful for all of you guys.

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
On Writing

Why I Use the Three-Act Story Structure

There are many story structures out there. Now while I know of only a handful, I have already chosen the one I’m going to use for the rest of my writing (or until I become a lot more experienced and decide its not for me).

I use the three-act story structure format. If you’re not familiar with it, I’ll give a quick recap of what it is below.

There are, obviously, three different acts in the three-act format.

The first one is the introduction of the protagonist and the protagonist’s normal world, hinting at the conflict that is coming. A major event occurs in this act and the protagonist’s life is changed. This is followed by what is called the first plot point. The first plot point is the point of no return for the protagonist. They cannot go back to the normal world. This act is generally the first 25% of the story.

The second act is generally broken into two parts by the midpoint, which we’ll get to in a second, the first half is the protagonist’s reaction to what happened in the first act. Then the midpoint comes and they learn new information, usually advancing the plot in relation to the conflict between the protagonist and the antagonist. The midpoint is also called the second plot point. This act is generally the largest chunk of your story, being around 50% of the story,

The third act is the climactic act. It starts with the third plot which is a major loss for the protagonist, such as a mentor dying or something of that nature. They generally react to that loss, more motivation is given, and then you get the climactic encounter between the protagonist and the antagonist. Then comes the resolution and end to the story.

There are a lot of subpoints to the acts of what is supposed to happen during those acts to keep the plot going, but I won’t address all of those right now.

So why do I use the three-act story structure?

Well, it makes the most sense to me for one thing. I see story structure that works almost like a triangle with the line going flat and then sharply curving upward and then back down again. That really isn’t how most stories work. The line going up to the climax is more gradual and then the line going down is a lot more drastic. The three-act structure makes it seem a lot more believable.

I’ve also found it’s very detail-oriented. It helps you ask questions about why things are happening and it breaks the story into enough chunks that you aren’t left with a huge chunk of story that you don’t know what happens. It makes sure that you have a general knowledge of what happens every 25ish% of the story.

So I use the three-act structure because it makes the most sense and is detail-oriented. But the story structure you use is purely a personal preference, nothing more. I prefer the three-act structure, but that doesn’t mean it’ll work the best for you!

What is your prefered story structure? Let me know in the comments below!

From my pen to your pape, may our sword never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
Music On Writing

The Music in Writing

I listen to a lot of music. A LOT of music. I listen to music while doing school, while I’m writing, pretty much if I’m doing something, music is going in the background.

While I listen to the normal pop songs and such, orchestra music, particularly scores from movies and TV shows, have a special place in my heart. This is because they give me inspiration when I need it.

Now I have no musical talent whatsoever. I’m not here to teach you how to write music or play music. I’m here to talk about how music inspires me.

Now I write Epic Fantasy as many of you know, so that requires a lot of creativity and effort if you want to tell an original story and world. I don’t want to copy what J.R.R. Tolkien, George R.R. Martin, Brandon Sanderson, or Patrick Rothfuss did (though I have only read two of those four authors, I promise I’m working on catching up!). I want to take what I liked about their stories, and twist them into something new, something different from what they’ve written, while still similar enough that it has the components that I and other readers enjoy.

Music helps me create. I don’t know what happens, but when I start listening to tracks like Hans Zimmer’s Time, Howard Shore’s The Breaking of the Fellowship, or pretty much anything by Ramin Djwaldi, I get inspired. Something in my mind just clicks and the creativity just starts to flow. The music helps give me a background to what I have going on in my subconscious. I have had many ideas for different components in my various projects (I currently have three with two in the frying pan, one being much larger than the other, and another one which is on the back burner). The music gives me inspiration to write because it unlocks what is already going on in my mind.

Another thing about music is that there is an abundance of it out there. So many movies and films have been made at this point that I discover new scores what it seems like every day. With each new score, there is something new that it can inspire. I’ve recently been listening to the Hans Zimmer Sherlock Holmes scores because I’ve been working on a short story mystery and they get me into the right mood for outlining/writing the mystery. Now when I write my Epic Fantasy project, I generally listen to scores from fantasies, such as Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, Westworld, Mission Impossible, you name it. I think part of why music inspires me is because it can help me visualize scenes. I haven’t even seen the movie or show three of the four of those scores are from! Yet I am able to get a feel from it for what I’m writing.

I am a huge music nerd if you haven’t been able to tell already. When a new movie comes out and I go see it, the first thing I do after seeing it is I go listen to the score. I did this with 1917, I had that score on repeat for hours. I look forward to new movies and shows for their scores because while movies can be really bad, the score can be really good for those movies! Currently looking forward to The Wheel of Time series, partly because I am about to start reading those books, and partly because it will be another fantasy score for me to listen to!

Now, this may have just been me rambling about my love for music, I hope it wasn’t. But more than that I hope that when you guys (or at least the five or six of you who actually read this blog) read my books that you will read something original and new, while still having that good feeling that you get when you read a new classic (like the one I got when reading Mistborn: The Final Empire). Many writers do different things to get themselves in the right writing mood.

Mine is music.

What is your favorite music score if you listen to them? If you don’t, what is the way you get into the mood for writing? Let me know in the comments below!

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
Book Review Reading

Book Review – The Well of Ascension

Spoilers for The Well of Ascension by Brandon Sanderson are to follow!


Well, I finished another book. And it was a good one! After the end of Mistborn: The Final Empire, I didn’t think that Sanderson would be able to make the sequel nearly as good as the first one. And while it wasn’t as good as The Final Empire (we’ll get into why in just a minute), it was still one heck of a read. I’ll give him one thing, Sanderson knows how to end a book with a bang!

So what did I enjoy the most about this book?

  1. The Characters – In every book I’ve read by Sanderson, he has not skimped on character yet. While Vin was a very dynamic character and is the center of the story, I enjoyed Sazed’s development more. I think this is because, by the end of the story, he is completely changed and we don’t know what he’s going to do. Sazed starts the book teaching young children all the different things he’s learned that way he can pass down his knowledge as a keeper. But, he’s taken away from it by Marsh (Kelsier’s brother) and he eventually travels back to Luthadel. He is rebelling against what his own people have told him to do. This is the first noticeable point in Sazed’s turn from the Terris religion and people. The second is when Tindwyl arrives and Sazed rekindles his love for her but because of his religion and ways doesn’t think he’s good enough for her. As the story goes on its a bit obvious that Sazed is beginning to doubt himself. His doubt continues to grow both when he Tindwyl dies in the battle and when he figures out what all the writings that he found meant (a big highlight of mine that we’ll touch on in a second) he races to stop Vin from unleashing the Well after Tindwyl’s untimely demise. He ends up failing, and that sends Sazed into what is a deeper depression. He ultimately rejects his people and leaves Luthadel with barely any notice to Vin or Elend. Sanderson pulled my heartstrings with this one because I loved Sazed! He was an awesome character and to see him fall into a depression-like this is heartbreaking. I can’t wait to see what happens to him in The Hero of Ages!
  2. The Writings Sazed Found – This is a minor detail, and The Final Empire may have done this as well. When Sazed travels with Marsh to a place where the Inquisitors had lived, he finds a long transcript carved into the metal. It is a minor thing at the beginning, but in the end, it hits hard. It was true writing stating how everything was a sham. What made this even better was how Sanderson put a line from it at the top of each chapter. Then, at the end, Sazed read the whole thing and realized the truth. He reads the whole thing, unbroken and everything makes sense to the reader and your anticipation and eagerness to find out how it ends grows. It was truly a marvelous plot twist and was one of my favorite things about the book.
  3. The Mist-Spirit – The Mist-Spirit was a weird aspect of the book for a lot of the novel. It was mysterious and I couldn’t figure out what its place was. It had a great pay off in the end, and while I’m curious to see what happens to it in The Hero of Ages, it was a neat part of the book.
  4. The End  – This is probably the most obvious one. The end is better than The Final Empire. If you read Mistborn: The Final Empire and decided you didn’t want to read the rest of the series, you’d be fine because most of the plots are resolved and there isn’t much that urges you to need the next book. The Well of Ascension does not do that. First, I must say that when Vin was going to the Well and Sazed was chasing after her to stop her, my heart was racing. I could not wait to find out what happened. When Elend was sliced open, my heart dropped. I genuinely thought that he would be dead. Then when Vin realized her mistake of letting the beast (or whatever it was) free my heart sank again because she could have saved Elend. But, it turned out that this was Elend’s Pits of Hathsin moment. It is revealed in the last chapter that Elend was discovered to be a Mistborn. There are so many loose threads that have me needing this next book! Though, I am sad that it will be my last journey with Vin, Elend, and the rest of the crew.

There were so many things I liked about this book that they vastly overshadowed the things I didn’t like, but I’ll still briefly mention what I didn’t like.

  1. The Pacing in the Middle of the Story – The book seemed to drag a little bit slowly and delve into the political side of things, and while I understand that this section helped make the end more of a bang, it still was rather slow for my tastes.
  2. Zane – Now I think Sanderson didn’t want us to like him, but I certainly didn’t. Especially after he tried to kill Vin. I wasn’t sorry to see him go at all. I do appreciate what Sanderson did writing the character, and he was well developed, but it doesn’t make me like him anymore.

The book was all around so good! The only reason I didn’t like it more than The Final Empire was because of the slow middle part of the book. But other than that, I thoroughly enjoyed it!

Have you read The Well of Ascension? If so let me know your thoughts below! I try and respond to all of the comments!


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
#aSotS #tIRS On My Writings

March 2020 Update on Book One in the #tIRS

I was thinking about it recently, and you blog readers haven’t had an update on my book in a while (I give readers of “The Raven” weekly updates on it though). So, I thought, “Let’s give the readers an update!” So here we go.

The progress is going slow, really slow. I haven’t had a week where I wrote over 5k words in my novel. I am currently sitting at 25k words and am roughly 31% of the way through the story.

But, I will say that it’s not for lack of thought about the story. In fact, I keep having new components and plots pop into my mind, and I’m not sure if five books will be long enough. I hope that isn’t the case and I’ll be able to do it well in five. But, lately I’ve realized that there are a lot of plots and subplots lining up! The first book is going to be pretty basic and set-up major parts of the story. But as we get into the later books in the series, there will be more major characters. The first book will be long (right now I’m guesstimating it will clock out at somewhere around 100k words, but that’s just right now, it could change), but it won’t be as complex. There are only two main characters and two viewpoints, and they are the antagonist and protagonist.

My goal is to finish the book in its entirety by the end of the year. That includes all my editing drafts, getting people to read it and give me feedback. So I need to have the first three drafts done by October at the latest. I think I can hit that, but as my plate fills up, it gets harder to make time to write. Doing one article a week can be a bit much too, in fact I’m considering dialing it down to an article every other week so that I can make more time to write. But, I’m not fully committed to that yet.

A big reason why I think the progress is going so slow is because this is my first big project I’ve undertaken. I’ve written a couple of stories that were not good and that I am not proud of at all, this one is gonna be different though, I can promise you that.

I have already added several, several characters and scenes that I had no idea about when I jumped into this draft. They have all worked out splendidly and I’m pleased with them, but we’ll see if they survive the next few drafts.

Another thing you may be wondering, “Why does he still keep referring to the book under these dumb hashtags? Just tell us the name!” And to that I say, it’s coming, eventually. I don’t want to reveal a name until the book has been accepted by a publisher or until I self publish. I will be submitting the book to publishers first and then if that goes poorly, I will try to do another draft, try again, and then if that fails, I will self-publish the book. So I’ll still have it done before the next book in a couple of well known series have come out.

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
Reading

Piggy’s Glasses, The Conch, and the Face Paint: An Exploration in Symbolism in The Lord of the Flies

This is a paper I did for my English class, so this article will not be focusing on teaching as much as I usually do in my articles.

Symbolism is a great way to enhance a story that has been used in many novels. Some have been used masterfully and have greatly improved the quality of the novel. William Golding’s novel The Lord of the Flies is a prime example of using symbols to enhance the details of the story. The symbols that William Golding uses are simple objects, but they tend to represent a lot in the novel. Golding uses the symbols in a way that they are not blatant, they are hidden within the story. Each time the reader reads his novel, they will find new bits of symbolism throughout the story. What happens to the symbols is also interesting to note as they can hint at certain things within the story. The novel, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding uses several symbols to enhance the story, including Piggy’s glasses to symbolize intelligence on the island, the conch to symbolize order and law, and the face paint symbolizing savagery.

First, Piggy’s glasses symbolize intelligence on the island. We know that they do because Piggy is an intelligent character. At the beginning of the novel, he is the first one to meet Ralph. He tries to befriend Ralph and though his efforts seem to fail, Piggy still gives him advice on what they should do. In Golding’s novel, Piggy is the one who suggests that Ralph use the conch to call the meeting together (Golding 11). Piggy is also the character who suggests several laws in the book, but they are generally ignored. Piggy is the only one who is forthcoming about laws that could benefit the group in survival, not just help the boys have fun. Howard Babb says that “Piggy is the more conscious of the adult world and of those who might have died in the plane crash” (Babb 11). This is true in the sense that Piggy is the one who is thinking about how to organize themselves since no adults have been discovered yet. All of Piggy’s motivations and actions show that he is an intelligent character, and therefore his glasses represent intelligence. His glasses are also needed to start the fire which is the only way that they know how to get home. Without the glasses, they would not be able to start the fire, and without the fire, they couldn’t send up smoke signals to ships passing by. It is interesting how the symbol of the glasses is used in this. Since Piggy is intelligent and Golding had already established that at this point in the book, they needed to use Piggy’s glasses to start the fire. This connection might not be caught at first glance, but they also seize the glasses from Piggy not letting him have a say in lighting the fire and they end up starting a large fire on the island. Then at the end of the book, the tribe steals the glasses in the middle of the night from Piggy so that they can light a fire. The other boys continuously steal the symbol of intelligence to lighting the fire. These glasses are vital to lighting the fire which is an important part of the community on the island. Then when the tribe of boys forms, they especially need the glasses. Without the glasses, they wouldn’t be able to eat the meat of the animals that they had killed. Another thing that is interesting to note is how the boys always need the glasses no matter which group it is. This shows that the boys need the intelligence to be a tribe. The glasses are most certainly a symbol of intelligence, and they are used significantly throughout the novel as a part of a plot point.

Another example of the excellent use of symbolism in The Lord of the Flies is the conch. The conch represents law and order in the book. Ralph uses it to call all the boys on the island together for their very first meeting. After the conch was blown, the children assembled on the beach and their very first meeting began. The conch was a symbol of order and law from the very first chapter! Without the conch, it most likely would have been harder for the boys to gather all the boys together for the meetings. Another rule the boys make in that first meeting is that the conch is needed to speak during the meetings. This way, the meetings are more orderly and not just the boys arguing over each other. With this rule, there is more order in the boy’s meetings. The rule does tend to be ignored by all the boys whenever Piggy is speaking, especially Jack. As the story goes on, especially towards the end of the book, the conch becomes a key point in the plot. The conch is the only way that Ralph retains control of the boys. He is able to keep his power as the leader for a little while longer as Jack begins to turn the tribe away from Ralph. Then, at the end of the book, during the final confrontation between Ralph, Piggy, and the savages, Jack shoves Piggy off the cliff smashing the conch along with Piggy. It is interesting to see that the most intelligent character, Piggy, is killed when the conch is destroyed. It is a symbol that law and order need intelligence as well. When the conch is destroyed the book seems to play out to where there is no law and order at all. Ralph is forced to flee and hide, and the tribe burns down the island. The conch emboldens the representation of law and order, and once it is destroyed, the law and order disappear.

The face paint in The Lord of the Flies is another symbol, representing savagery on the island. Jack and his hunters are the first ones to wear the face paint and as you read the book, they are the first ones to rebel against the law and order of the island, opting to hunt the pig instead of keeping the signal fire lit. If they had kept an eye out on the signal fire, they would have been able to see and signal the ship that went by the island. It is interesting to see that whenever the face paint is worn, the boys feel a need to kill. First, it was with the pig. The boys would do a chant saying “Kill the pig. Cut her throat. Spill her blood” (Golding 52). They wanted to kill the pig at first, then they needed to kill it. The need to kill is something that savages have, and these boys are savages whenever they are wearing the paint because they discover a need to kill with the paint on. The boys also wear the paint, when they kill Simon. Everyone present for the killing of Simon, except Ralph and Piggy, are wearing the paint. The need to kill comes over the boys again and they begin their chant again. Samuel Hynes notes that when the boys begin their chant this time “(it) is no longer ‘Kill the pig,” but ‘Kill the beast!’” (Hynes 19). The boys have changed every time that the paint is worn. They hunger for blood and hunger to kill, especially Jack who seems to be the ringleader of all the deaths. The face paint is also present on the tribe when the boys kill Piggy and destroy the conch. When they kill Piggy, they all are wearing face paint. It is interesting to note that every single time the face paint is present, an animal or person ends up dying. The pig dies, then Simon, and finally Piggy. Ralph would have been killed as well by the tribe of savages if the navy had not seen the smoke from the island and had arrived. The boys are changed when the wear the paint, they are changed into savages, and the symbol of the face paint makes it very clear.

The symbolism in Lord of the Flies is very prominent and enhances the story with Piggy’s glasses, the conch, and the face paint all being symbols that appear multiple times through the course of the story. These items also play many key roles in the story. Piggy’s glasses symbolize intelligence since Piggy is an intelligent character, and because without his glasses, the boys wouldn’t have an easy way to light the fire. The conch represents order and law because it is the item that was first used to call all the boys together. It also is needed to speak at the meetings that the boys hold. And finally, the face paint symbolizes the savagery with every time a death happens, the face paint is worn by the characters doing the killing. Without the symbolism in the novel, it would have been an enjoyable book, but the reader would not have these small symbols that enhance the story. Every time the novel is read, the reader is sure to find something new in the novel with each read.

WORKS CITED:

Babb, Howard. The Novels of William Golding. Ohio State University Press, 1970.

Hynes, Samuel. “William Golding’s Lord of the Flies.” Critical Essays on William Golding, Edited by Baker, James. G.K. Hall & Co., 1988, pp 13-21.

Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. Perigee, 1954.

Thanks guys for reading! Let me know what you guys think in the comments below!

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
On Writing

What is the Most Important Part of a Book? Act Three

If you have not read Part One or Two, start here with Part One and then finish Part Two here.

So, we’ve reached the end. Act three.

This act typically ends our journey with the characters we’ve grown to love. It’s a sad goodbye (unless Disney decides to reboot your series for a less than stellar sequel trilogy).

Before we get into the points on why the third act is so good, I must put a stipulation. The third act can only be good if your first two acts did their job. Did you set up a protagonist that people cared for or are interested in enough to care about what happens in the third act? Are there enough hints to your twist ending so that it doesn’t feel random and out of nowhere? And is your antagonist set up as a dangerous conflict to your protagonist? If the answer is no to any of these, you might want to rework some of your first and second act, because if you leave any of these components out, your ending may not end up being as killer as you think it is.

Now, considering all of these things have been checked off, let’s look at why the third act is so good.

There are several reasons, here are three!

1. The first and most obvious thing is that we are given the last big confrontation between the antagonist and protagonist. It’s all built up to this. We finally get the big fight between them. This is generally a pretty awesome and satisfying part of the book. But it can also be shocking. You may not know how the hero will win, but you know they will win. But most of the time at a cost. They generally will lose something dear to them, sometimes not, but generally, you will see the loss of someone or something close to the protagonist. A good example of this is in the movie Super 8 (warning, if you have not seen this movie, major spoilers are to follow). In the movie, Joe has carried a locket that was his Mom’s for the course of most of the movie. It is fairly obvious that he treasures the object and that it reminds him of his mom. At the end of the movie when the alien is building its ship by taking the majority of the metal in Lillian, Ohio. As Joe, Alice, and their fathers watch the metal suck towards the ship. That’s when you see Joe’s locket start heading towards the ship, he grabs it, but the ship still needs it and isn’t complete without it. He lets go of the locket. He had to lose something that was precious to him in order to let the alien leave and therefore winning the movie’s struggle. This is also a great example of character growth, but that’s not what today’s post is about.

2. The second thing is the resolution. The third act concludes things, but the story doesn’t end after the antagonist loses. The story ends only once you have finished the last page or when the screen goes black. That’s when it ends, not before and not after. Do you know those last couple of chapters between the defeat of the protagonist and the end of the book? Those can help decide whether or not you like a book. There was an epic fantasy book that I read a couple of years ago, I won’t mention the name of it because some readers really like it. It was the first of a series and the series has yet to be finished as far as I know. I loved the beginning of this book and the middle. It was so drastically different from anything that I had read to that point. When I arrived at the third act, it went in a completely different direction then what I thought. The character did things that I as a reader did not think he would. I barely even finished it. I just skimmed the last couple of chapters. This really saddened me because I had grown close with the land and the laws and the main character, but the ending was such a disappointment. Now, every time I see a book by that author, I disregard it. So why am I telling you this? Your resolution needs to go along with what you have set up. If not, it disappoints readers like me. Another resolution is key to the third act is because it is the last time you interact with the characters. It’s your goodbye, and this leads to point three.

3. The last thing is the want to spend more time with the characters, also known as a hole. If the book did its job, and especially if it’s a part of a series and is the end of a series, you feel that hole. It’s over. All the time you spent with those characters, it’s over. Their story has been told. This only happens if the author has given a meaningful ending and has tied up all the plots and subplots in their novel. And when you finish, well that’s when you have to find a new book to read.

So why is the third act the most interesting part of a book? Because of the final conflict between the two opposing forces, the resolution, and the end that leaves you wanting more.

So that’s it! Three acts, which is your favorite? Be sure to comment below and let me know and comment anything you have to say relating to Act Three as well! I want to hear what you guys think!

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Categories
On Writing

What is the Most Important Part of a Book? Act Two

This is part two in a three-part series. If you have not read part one, please do so here!

So before this became a three-part series, I had originally planned on doing just one post on why the middle part of the book is so important. But, as I got to thinking I realized that a case could be made for each section of the book. 

But why did I first think of the middle? Well, I had just finished Mistborn: The Final Empire (you can read my review here), and the ending was spectacular. As I thought about the book after I set the book down, I thought to myself “Why was that ending so good?” And the answer is pretty simple. Set-up. 

But why does set-up in the middle effect the way your book ends? We’ve all read that one book where the author was building up to a really great climax and then they suddenly did something completely different then what you thought, but the author didn’t foreshadow any of the ending. The ending still might be good, but it’s not as good as it could have been. Endings like this leave you unsatisfied and sometimes can sour the reader’s experience.

Now what I’m not saying is for you to tell your readers exactly what’s going to happen before it happens. That can also leave a reader unsatisfied as there was no surprise in the ending. 

So what does all of this have to do with the middle part of a book? Well, the second act usually does a good bit of foreshadowing. Now there are some exceptions where the ending is set up in the first act and the second act doesn’t do as much foreshadowing. But typically I feel as if there is a good bit of foreshadowing in the second act. 

Along with foreshadowing, the protagonist is usually given a major source of information or motivation in the middle of the second act. This can come as a backstory reveal, or a character seeing something that fuels the flames of their motivation. 

So the second act is essential in that it drastically sets up a satisfying ending for your readers, along with giving the protagonist motivation. Without foreshadowing or character motivation, your third act can be lackluster and not as enjoyable for the reader, even if it is a great ending!

Next week we’ll conclude the three-part series by exploring the final act of the book and why it’s important.

Please comment below with any additional things you have to say! I learn just as much writing these posts as you guys do, so I can easily miss things!

From my pen to your paper, may our swords never clash.


Thanks for reading! If you want to get updates on when new blog posts come out, subscribe to my newsletter, “The Raven,” and be the first to get updates and exclusive updates on my writings! If you want to contribute to the conversation, please comment below! I will try to respond to all comments!


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.